KEYWORDS: letter, nightmare, canyon, article, storm, mountains

Nightmare in California

May 31, 2003


(Sent in by D. Neve, 12/3/80.)

Dear Dad‚

GBY! WLY SO MUCH! Look what I ran across in the latest issue of TIME—they called it:

"NIGHTMARE IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA" & even the word "nightmare" reminds you that someone dreamed it in prophecy years before! PTL! You always said you want to hear when God fulfills His promises or judges our enemies, so here it is—a literal fulfillment of the Letter "Mountainslide" Number 120, written October 21st, 1971.—Exactly 100 months before it was fulfilled! (PTL!—Dad.) The article says:

THE WORST HIT AREA WAS THE "MOUNTAINS TO THE NORTH & EAST OF DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES." You said in 120:7 that in your dream you were in "those real high mountains northeast of Los Angeles."—The exact spot of the disaster! Well, the Lord certainly gave them warning far enough in advance, didn't He! I wonder if any heeded?

ONE PHOTO IN THE ARTICLE LOOKS LIKE A PROOF JACOB CARTOON USED FOR HIS COVER SKETCH FOR YOUR LETTER! It'd be nice to re-publish the Letter, wouldn't it, & include this article with photos after it. Sort of a "prophecy–fulfillment" pamphlet. I bet the kids in the States could really get it out!

ALSO I WONDER ABOUT THE END OF THE DREAM & if the Family has testimonies from the disaster. Were there some there at this time to be a witness?

PRAISE THE LORD, love you Dad. We're still with you all the way! How exciting it is now as Letter after Letter finds real fulfillment in the daily newspaper headlines. (Amen!—Tks!—Dad, 31/3/80.)—And another warning to you Californians!—Read it in Vol. I!

Time Magazine Article:

Nightmare in Southern California

Torrential rains sweep in from Pacific, killing at least 24

To meteorologists, it was an unusual phenomenon: a "tropical connection." Storm after storm formed over the northern Pacific Ocean, picked up moisture from the tropics and rushed toward the West Coast on 150-m.p.h. jet streams. To Southern Californians, it was nothing less than a nightmare. Six times in nine days, storms struck, dumping nearly 13 in. of rain, killing at least 24 people and causing damage estimated at $425 million.

Worst hit were the chic canyons in the Santa Monica Mountains to the north and east of downtown Los Angeles. The hills are home to some of the area's wealthiest and most famous people who live in semi-rural splendor in houses on the canyon bottoms, surrounded by oak trees and chaparral, or in hillside houses perched on stilts. Since fires—another scourge of the well-to-do Angelenos—have destroyed much of the vegetation in past years, the earth was quickly saturated by the rains. It turned into avalanches of mud.

On Lookout Mountain Hill‚ a mudslide destroyed two houses and left the $1.25 million mansion of famed Divorce Lawyer Marvin Mitchelson tottering on the edge of a cliff and in danger of being washed away by the next storm. He was resigned to losing the house‚ which engineers doubted could be saved. He quipped, "I can live in my office, I can practice law in the courthouse and I don't see my wife much anyway."

But other canyon residents worked desperately to save their property. In Mandeville Canyon, Beverly Hills Psychologist Philip Flexo and his wife Pat shoveled day and night to divert a stream of mud and water from their $250,000 home. No matter what happened to the house, Flexo vowed not to leave the canyon permanently. Said he: "We moved here to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Despite the fires, rains, flood and muds, I won't move."

In Monterey Park, Joanna Dresser was packing suitcases to flee when she heard a thud. Said she: "I looked outside and saw my husband and two friends being pushed by the mud against and underneath a car. I couldn't get the front door open, so I bashed a window. I threw my dogs out‚ then I jumped out." Her husband and friends survived.